Transparency and Accountability in
Natural Resource Revenue Management

To combat corruption and increase accountability and government effectiveness in many developing countries, the international community and advocacy groups have been pushing for greater transparency. Consequently, advocates, officials, and diplomats are increasingly focusing on transparency as the means to better manage revenues from high-value natural resources in developing countries. Read more about the project.


LATEST ARTICLES

Global Inequality fuels revolution: New cross-national evidence of the economic origins of conflict

The further a country’s development falls behind the richest countries, the more likely it is to see protests and even revolutions. That is the central finding of research by Christa Brunnschweiler and Päivi Lujala, to be presented at the Royal Economic Society’s annual conference in Brighton in March 2016. […]

My Three-Weeks in Ghana`s Ashanti and Eastern Regions

By Sam A. Kasimba, PhD Candidate, NTNU.
Between 29th September and 20th October 2015, I was in Ghana for my preliminary fieldwork with an objective to know more about my chosen study areas. […]

Note from Transparency workshop

By Siri A. Rustad, Senior Researcher, PRIO.
November 17th the UNDP Oslo Governance Centre hosted a one-day seminar on the extractive industry and conflict prevention. The aim was to “deepening a shared understanding, explore synergies and identify areas for action on how to enhance the role of the extractive industries in promoting peaceful and inclusive societies.” […]

Korrupsjon og grådighet skal undersøkes

Av Steinar Brandslet, Gemini.
Når utviklingsland får store inntekter fra naturressurser, gir det muligheter, men også problemer. Kan økt åpenhet i forvaltningen bidra til å gjøre naturressurser til en velsignelse snarere enn en forbannelse? En ny, internasjonal undersøkelse vil gi svar. […]

Illusionary Transparency? Oil Revenues, Information Disclosure and Transparency

By Jerome Jeffison Yaw Ofori & Päivi Lujala.
Abstract:
Experience shows that discovery of valuable natural resources can become a curse rather than a blessing, and transparency has been identified as key to better resource governance because it can limit opportunities for corruption and mismanagement.
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